ScrapHappy July 2020: Threading the Needle

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So, what’s this pile of old scrap for?

It’s a rare thing when the two sides of the same coin can be bridged but this is one of those times – I give you the Hard ScrapHappy needle threader for Soft Scraphappyness.

The wire has to be thin enough to pass through the eye of a needle (oh, the irony if camel hair worked) but thick enough to hold its shape. The handle just has to be, you know, handleable.

The two bits needed come from an old hard disk drive – the handle in this case is a memory chip and the wire is from the sense coil of the read/write head. In English, these are a funny rectangular bit with tiny legs and a bit of wire from something that looks like it belongs in a juke box. There are plenty other leggy quadrilaterals and bits of wire that can be used from a single hard drive to make needle threaders and, while I don’t think you could run a business making threaders from hard drives and thus help save the planet, well, every little helps as at least one supermarket with a sense of irony likes to state.

 

 

I soldered the wire onto the top few legs that were still attached to the chip, and cut the other legs off flush with the body so that there weren’t any pointy bits. The wire can be made more pointy to taste by just squeezing the end with pliers.

I made some earlier using connecting wire (from an old reel of wire I bought as part of my electronics hobby), sugru and old buttons.

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One I made out of (slightly) more conventional materials

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Ready to thread…

Eh, voila! Hard and soft scraphappiness in perfect harmony!

oOo

This is a wonderful idea from the equally wonderful Kate and Gun. Lots of other people now join in, so check their sites too for more ScrapHappyness!

Kate (me!)Gun, TittiHeléneEvaSue, Lynn, Lynda,
Birthe, Turid, Susan, Cathy,  Tracy, Jill, Claire, Jan,
Moira, SandraLindaChrisNancyAlysKerryClaireJean,
Joanne, Jon, HayleyDawnGwen, Connie, Bekki, Pauline,
Sue L, Sunny, Kjerstin and Vera

 

Categories: computers, recycling, ScrapHappy, Sewing | Tags: , , | 17 Comments

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17 thoughts on “ScrapHappy July 2020: Threading the Needle

  1. I’m impressed.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. ooo. you have given me an idea.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. You may be able to answer an abiding question of mine. I have long searched for the perfect needle threader, and have dismissed most of the ones where a thin wire is inadequately attached to some sort of handle. Mostly this is because the wire isn’t strongly enough anchored; generally it pulls away within a few uses. The one I currently use isn’t suitable for small needles, it’s made of one piece of thin metal with a hole pierced in the smaller pointy end. Great for big embroidery needles, hopeless for smaller ones. My question is: how durable will the solder be over time? How would you feel about conducting a stress-test for one of your samples?

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    • (Scrap)Happy to do a stress test! My feeling is the wire will break long before the solder joint does. Let me know the kind of test you had in mind or I can send you a few…

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      • I have a fine embroidery needle and I have broken at least 4 threaders trying to thread it. It’s narrow but the eye is long. I use Anchor tapestry wool (it’s possible the Snail may have something similar to experiment with). It would be interesting to know if your threader can bring the tapestry wool through a long but narrow needle eye without breaking after a short time.

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  4. Going Batty in Wales

    Clever chap! I don’t happen to have an old hard disc drive lying around but a button, sugru and wire I might have!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Oh – Please please make one with a camel hair….

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Well here’s another thing my hubby could make for me if ever he finds the time!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. wow, very impressive. I would need a string on it so I could wear it around my neck to find it when needed.

    Liked by 1 person

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